Fiddlers Green

Downloadable Fun!
It is currently Sun Dec 10, 2017 8:15 pm

All times are UTC - 7 hours




Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 4 posts ] 
Author Message
 Post subject: Non FG models
PostPosted: Wed Dec 24, 2008 8:30 am 
Offline
Paper Model CINC
User avatar

Joined: Thu Mar 20, 2008 2:04 pm
Posts: 1182
Location: Waterlooville, Hampshire, England
Since I started card modelling earlier this year I've only ever built FG models. I love how quickly they go together and the amazing results that can be obtained with them in such a relatively short space of time. I do, however, have quite a few non FG models that I've downloaded over the past few months but don't really know where to start with them. None of them have the tabs that I've gotten used to when building my FG models, so I presume I have to create some kind of joining strips to hold the parts together?! Any other hints and tips from those more experienced with this type of card modelling would be most appreciated :D.


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Wed Dec 24, 2008 8:41 am 
Offline
Paper Model CINC
User avatar

Joined: Wed Jul 02, 2008 10:29 pm
Posts: 1118
Location: Eastern Oklahoma, US
Chris,
Cut strips approx. 1/2 cm (about the width of the average tab). Where you think there should be a glue strip, cut the appropriate length and glue to one side first, let dry, then the other. I often cut the tabs off models and use them this way. Makes a wonderful butt joint with little seam.
Tom

_________________
"TANSTAAFL !" "There Ain't No Such Thing As A Free Lunch!" Lazarus Long AKA Robert A. Heinlein

Currently working on: FG Wippet 1/72
Recently Completed: FG FT-17 Dio 1/38


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Sun Dec 28, 2008 2:58 pm 
Offline
Paper Model Overlord
User avatar

Joined: Fri Oct 06, 2006 1:15 pm
Posts: 528
Location: Alameda CA
Outside FG, few models use tabbed overlap sections, and most DO print the internal glue strips for you (usually adjacent to their sections). But a common design is the butt jointed section WITHOUT a joining glue strip, where the fuselage sections are glued together end to end like beads. The problem I have with that kind of design is it's very intolerant of any imprecision, and the bulkhead faces have to be dead flat. Where I encounter such designs I discard the mating bulkheads and build it up as a "conventional" internal glue strip joined model.

With FG models, I'm with Lep on this - cut all the tabs off and make internal glue strips for cleaner joints. I don't cut tabs on the strip, instead I cut closely spaced slits so that the finished strip looks like a feather on one side (and I cut these slits BEFORE gluing the non-slitted side to its piece, the slits cross the "border" so I can cut them quickly - more quickly than cutting tabs).

I find with tabs that you can sometimes "see" the tabs beneath the skin as the skin draws up tight against the flat area of the tab, whereas with the slits their width is so infinitesimal the sections retain smooth contours.

The disadvantage of butt jointed sections with internal glue strips is the additional work of creating the glue strip, and the requirement for precise cutting of the butt jointed edges, as any imprecision will result in a small gaps here and there around the joint (with tabs the overlap will hide a good deal of imprecision). Tinting the both the glue strip and butt jointed edges does hide these gaps to some extent.

Another thing I do is Photoshop the model and, where feasible, relocate a joint so it coincides with a natural joint on the real airplane. For example, virtually all model fuselage sections have their longitudinal joint along the top or bottom of the section. But few real airplanes have seams at those locations, principally because the radii are tighter at those locations and a joint there would be under more stress than, say on the fuselage side, which is much less curved. So I do the same with the model pieces: Photoshop two copies of the fuselage section together at their former seam, then cut off the duplicated area on either side at some point on the fuselage side that coincides with the seam on the fuselage side of the real airplane. Makes it easier to build, too, as the section is less "springy" at the less curved seam location and doesn't try to pull itself apart. The disadvantage is that it takes a LOT of time to re-cast the pieces this way.

As with everything, you trade speed and ease for authenticity, and we all have our own "lines in the sand" where anything beyond the line is too *&%^ for our taste. I'm one of those guys who prizes authenticity, or "realism" over almost all considerations of speed and ease - and my output is small because of it.


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Tue Jan 06, 2009 11:14 am 
Offline
Paper Model CINC
User avatar

Joined: Thu Mar 20, 2008 2:04 pm
Posts: 1182
Location: Waterlooville, Hampshire, England
Thanks for the help guys :D.


Top
 Profile  
 
Display posts from previous:  Sort by  
Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 4 posts ] 

All times are UTC - 7 hours


Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 2 guests


You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot post attachments in this forum

Search for:
Jump to:  
cron
Powered by phpBB® Forum Software © phpBB Group