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PostPosted: Sat Dec 17, 2011 4:58 pm 
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FG 90# stock

Joined: Fri Nov 25, 2011 7:45 pm
Posts: 27
Location: Fayette, MO
I am about halfway through designing an A10 Warthog. Here is what I have got so far and how I got there :mrgreen:

Here are my basics. Xacto knife, straight edge, hot glue gun, and fingernail file for scoring.
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I have found a dremel tool to be the fastest way to cut ends off of cans. I am using a reinforced wheel that will generally last 100+ cans.
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There are a couple different ways I use the pattern. In this picture I have taped the vertical stabilizer in place and will cut around it.
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Since the scores need to be done on the reverse side, I mark each end of the score with my scoring tool. Once cut out I will connect the dots with a straight edge and scoring tool.
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Next I run a very very heavy glue bead down the score and glue to other side.
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Instead of cutting a right and left, I cut one side, glue it in place and then cut out the second piece using the first as a template. This gives a much cleaner finished part.
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Next, I made the horizontal stabilizers using the same method. They are then attached to the vertical stabilizer as shown.
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Next I begin making the fuselage starting at the rear. Since I am going to be making a number of long straight scores and cuts I lay the pattern over the can as shown and puncture the can at the end of each score and cut.
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Next, I flip the can over and connect the points using a straight edge.
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Once both sides are cut out, beginning with the top seam, I align the right side to the left and tape in place.
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Next, I hinge back one side exposing glue tab and apply a very heavy glue bead.
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To keep the bottom seam clean, I tape the fuselage externally and pour lots of hot glue down the seam on the inside of the fuselage.
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After constructing the next section of fuselage I align and tape the two sections in place and once more, pour lots of glue on the inside seam.
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The engines are the easy part. The model was scaled so a full can is used.
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The turbines are a circle cut with a series of scores and cuts.
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That is what I have so far. I should be able to get the rest drawn up and built next week.


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PostPosted: Sun Dec 18, 2011 2:07 pm 
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FG 90# stock

Joined: Wed Apr 08, 2009 4:36 pm
Posts: 40
interesting build. I can see from using the cans as the engines that this model is going to be just huge!


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PostPosted: Tue Dec 20, 2011 4:59 pm 
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FG 90# stock

Joined: Fri Nov 25, 2011 7:45 pm
Posts: 27
Location: Fayette, MO
It is going to be pretty big for sure. It is a little over 2' long.

Next step involves building up the next section of fuselage. Assembly is the same as with the other sections. Here is a shot of the canopy section.
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The wings are made in two sections. The first section starts with the lower half. Scores have been added to keep it rigid.
Two folded strips are added for strength and to aid in shaping the wing.
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Once these are glued in place, the top section is glued at the front and folded rearward.
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The top is glued at the rear. In case the top doesn’t lie correctly, an iron can be used to re melt the hot glue.
Once glued in place the excess is trimmed from the rear.
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The wings are then added to the fuselage.
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Forming the canopy is done by butting up edges and securing with tape. A heavy bead of glue is added to the inside. Once the glue cools, shaping and bending is done. The glue can be remelted if necessary if the joint angles are correct.
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The second section of wing will require cans to be glued in line to create the necessary length. This is done by making a single cut across the top of two cans. With the clean edge on top, overlap second can by approximately 3/16” and tape in place. Once taped across full seam, hinge open and apply a heavy bead of glue. Add one more can.
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The wing bottom is cut out and folded strips are added just like the short section. The top of the wing is also done the same as the short section.
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When attaching the the wing, I started out by running tape across the top of the wing where the short and long section meet. The dihedral angle is easily made and held in place. Small semicircular holes are cut on the bottom where the two wings meet and glue is poured over the inside joint.
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After gluing a strip is glued in place over the holes.
Here are a few shots of it up to where I stopped. You can see how much tape is used. It not only holds parts in place but it protects the surface until finished.
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The parts left are the nose cone, main gun, wing tips, exhaust, landing gear, weapon pylons and some missiles if I don't get too lazy :mrgreen:


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PostPosted: Tue Dec 20, 2011 7:02 pm 
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FG 90# stock

Joined: Wed Apr 08, 2009 4:36 pm
Posts: 40
Interesting building techniques used here. Glue gun approach is unique as is the scoring of the cans. There appears to be a modest use of cans as well. I say this because of the fact that an average 1/40th scale build of one of my models can require upwards of 48-51 cans. But then again, I spend considerable amount of material reinforcing the structures as well to prevent dents when models are inevitably handled. Experience taught me to do this, especially after they were handled at a craft show and inadvertently dented as cans so often do. Following this build with interest. :D


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PostPosted: Fri Dec 23, 2011 9:26 am 
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FG 90# stock

Joined: Wed Apr 08, 2009 4:36 pm
Posts: 40
As soon as you have the rest of the pattern worked out on this, I will give it a go and see how my interpretation works out. Here are the special orders I have been working on as Santa's little can helper his year:

My Wheel loader:

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My custom built kit bashed 34 Ford Hot Rod:

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PostPosted: Fri Dec 23, 2011 4:40 pm 
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FG 90# stock

Joined: Fri Nov 25, 2011 7:45 pm
Posts: 27
Location: Fayette, MO
Those are terrific! I am sure you will have some very happy customers with those.

I am just finishing up the wheel housing and am coming up with a good way to do the nose. I should be able to get the rest of it over to you this weekend if all goes according do my diabolical plan :twisted:


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PostPosted: Sat Dec 24, 2011 11:50 am 
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FG 90# stock

Joined: Fri Nov 25, 2011 7:45 pm
Posts: 27
Location: Fayette, MO
All righty, these last parts are a royal pain. I think this is why I saved them for last.

The following steps show the wheel housing....

First, cut out the wheel housing sides, one left and one right.
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Next, beginning at the front, glue the each side onto the bottom of the wheel housing.
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At a right angle butt up the sides to the bottom and tape in place(beginning at the front and working towards the back)
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Once completed, flip over and apply heavy bead to joint all the way around.
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The front/top of the housing is formed from one piece.
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Form and tape
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Apply heavy bead of glue
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Spot glue at the front only.
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Apply a heavy bead along the glue tab on upper part. Using finger, press tab with glue to lower half, being careful not to burn yourself.
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Check fit installed on the wing and trim if necessary. Once fitted, a bead of glue on the bottom of wing is sufficient to hold housing in place.
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The landing gear is made of a small diameter roll and cut tabs for detail
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Wheels are easily formed by finding a properly sized ring to use as a template.
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Apply tons of glue as usual and trim out
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Make a heavy circle of glue and press as shown
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Cut tabs again for a little more detail
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Puncture housing with xacto knife and glue in place
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The nose is formed from a main section with two scored squares left and right and 4 scored trianges(only two shown)
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The top and bottom are glued in place and the sides are formed one at a time and glued in place.
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In the event you goof up, no problem, just touch briefly to a hot iron to remelt glue. When doing this, ensure nearby joints are taped securely. If they are not, they will come undone. When this happens there is much weeping, wailing and gnashing of teeth.
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Gun is formed with varying sizes of tightly rolled can. I dimpled the shroud with a nail and took a sharpie and gave it six barrels.
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A slot is cut on the underside of the nose for the gun to sit in.
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Add wing tips
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I was too lazy to do the bombs and stuff so I am calling it done till after the first of the year
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More Pics http://www.fiddlersgreen.net/forum/viewtopic.php?f=3&t=3921&p=24761#p24761

All in all I am happy with it even with it being a prototype. When I do a second I believe it will be much cleaner and slightly more refined. I will be doing missiles and other minor details after the first of the year.


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PostPosted: Mon Dec 26, 2011 8:34 am 
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FG 90# stock

Joined: Wed Apr 08, 2009 4:36 pm
Posts: 40
Interesting conclusion to this model. The beta build with cans seems to always be this way. A few tweaks to the design and a completed model that still looks good despite the issues encountered. The final model is indeed huge! How big did it come out? Only suggestion would be to perhaps roll the engines out of cans instead of using a full size can to cut down the size, this will make it more stable...


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PostPosted: Mon Dec 26, 2011 8:48 am 
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FG 90# stock

Joined: Fri Nov 25, 2011 7:45 pm
Posts: 27
Location: Fayette, MO
ngwithrsd wrote:
Interesting conclusion to this model. The beta build with cans seems to always be this way. A few tweaks to the design and a completed model that still looks good despite the issues encountered. The final model is indeed huge! How big did it come out? Only suggestion would be to perhaps roll the engines out of cans instead of using a full size can to cut down the size, this will make it more stable...


The full sized cans also made it very tail heavy. I couldn't put enough weight in the nose to make it stay on all three wheels. Overall length was about 22" with a 28" wingspan. I will get the final pieces over to you soon so you can try your hand at it.

I am looking forward to going back and applying some of the things learned to earlier models. Running folded strips inside the length of the wing ensures a near perfect wing without the usual fights with twisting I have often run into.

I think I will take do as you suggested and try my hand at an F18 Super Hornet.
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PostPosted: Tue Dec 27, 2011 10:49 pm 
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Botbuster Master
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Joined: Thu Apr 28, 2005 5:08 pm
Posts: 2345
Location: HARTSHORNE, OKLA.
love the Wart hog!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

_________________
Laterz
Possm_23
Never say anything you wouldnt think out loud!
Take your time leavin.....but hurry back!!!!
Every tub has to sit on its own bottom!!!!


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PostPosted: Tue Jan 03, 2012 10:02 pm 
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FG 90# stock

Joined: Wed Apr 08, 2009 4:36 pm
Posts: 40
Just finished designing a 1932 Ford Five Window Coupe and decided to share the photos. The plans for this model will be available for sale on our website soon:

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PostPosted: Wed Jan 04, 2012 8:36 am 
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FG 90# stock

Joined: Fri Nov 25, 2011 7:45 pm
Posts: 27
Location: Fayette, MO
That looks terrific, I bet you sell some of those.

I should be finishing up a mitsibishi zero later today, I will ge it posted when I do. i had to put the F18 on hold. i found a locak art gallery that wants to carry these. I will then be putting together a great big C130. This is getting addictive now :-)


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PostPosted: Wed Jan 04, 2012 8:49 am 
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FG 90# stock

Joined: Wed Apr 08, 2009 4:36 pm
Posts: 40
Art galleries and museums love these. I have two large displays hanging in our local gallery.

How big are you planning on the C-130? Remember the larger you go, you will have no choice but to reinforce the structure. Aluminum sheeting and even wooden supports are required when building upwards of four feet or larger in order to prevent the structure from eventually caving in on itself...


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PostPosted: Wed Jan 04, 2012 9:16 am 
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FG 90# stock

Joined: Fri Nov 25, 2011 7:45 pm
Posts: 27
Location: Fayette, MO
I am going to scale the body to the diameter of a 2 litre bottle. My plan is to fill the 2 litrer with expanding foam before covering with cans. This should give the strength i need. I will take lots of photos as it comes together. Not sure exactly how big yet, i haven't got around to breaking out the ole calculator.


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PostPosted: Wed Jan 04, 2012 10:53 am 
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FG 90# stock

Joined: Wed Apr 08, 2009 4:36 pm
Posts: 40
Oh okay so it wont be made completely out of aluminum then. The two liter bottle concept with the extendible foam is a novel idea, if the aircraft isn't too large, it may hold for a while without compressing into itself. The aluminum sheeting from lowes will hold structures upwards of eight feet...Just an idea

You are also going to have to put a support through one of your to litter bottles to support the wings or else they will sag and weaken the structure...


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