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 Post subject: Grumman Duck Tutorial
PostPosted: Fri Jun 29, 2012 5:54 pm 
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Here is a little ditty to help any one that my be interested in building the Grumman Duck. While looking through this, there are a couple of things to keep in mind. One, this is the first time I've built this model. Two, I'm building fairly quickly and not adding any fancy extra details.

Here we go!

I started by pre-rolling all of the fuselage pieces. I used a 1/2 inch PVC pipe and a 1/4 inch brass rod to get the proper curviture into the pieces before gluing.

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Next, I started building the main fuselage. Once I glued each individual piece, I made sure to dry fit the sections together. Once I started gluing, I worked in from the tail, attaching the small conical piece to the next piece first, and then using the larger piece to add to and so on.
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When building the canopy, you can get nice and rounded seams. First, just line up the pieces at the joints. Next, I use my finger tip to roll the joint in my hand, and then I press it again the cutting mat to press out any high points made by the paper not wanting to smoosh. I follow this up with another hand roll. The trick to doing this properly is having enough glue to soften the paper without getting it too wet and ruining the integrity of the part.
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Next, attach the canopy to the main fuselage. (Be sure to cut out the slots for the canopy BEFORE you roll the main fuselage).
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PostPosted: Fri Jun 29, 2012 6:07 pm 
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Once the fuselage is done you can start working on the float. The float is made of 4 pieces. Two for the front half, and two for the rear half. Each half consists of a top and bottom piece. I recommend starting with the top piece for each half, These pieces have a bulkhead that allows for structural stability.

When building these, start where the bulkhead attaches to the sides of the float. This will put the paper into the general shape you need to finish up the curved areas toward the tip of the float.
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Once the main piece is done, you can start placing the bottom skin onto the float. Again, start at the bulkhead and work toward the tip of the float. On the front part of the float (more curved part) be sure to place the part carefully. There should not be any gaps where the joints come together. It needs to be flush at each one to ensure a proper fit.
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Once the float halves are done, join them together in the center, gluing the bulkheads to each other using the printed diagram on the parts.
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Now comes the fun part (sarcasm is spilling over here). The center piece that connects the fuselage and the float together can be a down right pain to get on straight. One of the first steps to success is making sure you cut the bottom half of the insignia on the fuselage free. It should stick straight down away from the rolled tube. This is where you dry-fit like CRAZY!

Once you're sure everything is set up properly, start with one of the sides and line it up at the front by slipping it under the insignia. Be sure to put some glue on the back side of the insignia and on the 3 glue tabs on the center piece. Then, start slowly lining up the part and apply little spots of glue along the piece. You will have to hold the rear point for a couple of minutes to hold it in place.
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After that side is set, do the other! It should look like this when glued on completely. (fuselage is just sitting on top of the float, it's not glued yet.
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Once the glue is set, add the front fairing (front piece above the float in the last picture) to the center part and it's ready to join to the float.


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PostPosted: Fri Jun 29, 2012 6:16 pm 
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WINGS!

The sings on the Duck are pretty standard design for FG models. There is a large full length top wing (yellow goes on top) and two smaller bottom wings. Carefully score the leading edge and then fold gently to make the airfoil shape in the wings.

When gluing the bottom wings into place, I found it worked to put glue on the "glue area" all around the wing root, and slip it into place in the fuselage. I then ran a quick fillet of glue around the wing to fill in any open spaces, and then braced the wing on my glue bottle to get it to set at the correct angle and height.
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I did this for both lower wings. While that set, I built the top wing and made the wing struts and supports.

When everything was dry, I connected the top wing to the bottom wings. I used a type of super glue to first connect the wing end struts to the bottom wings, and then I placed the top wings on them. Once the glue had tacked up a bit, I flipped the whole thing over and used the weight of the plane to help hold things still while the glue set.

Once the wings are on, here's what you get
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I still have to put the center wing struts on, as well as do the wing floats and landing gear, but that will have to wait until later this weekend.


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PostPosted: Sat Jun 30, 2012 10:00 am 
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Willy you make it look so easy. Great photos and very helpful. How in the heck did yo get the end piece so tight and to a point like that? Big difference between me a beginner and you a master builder. I'm still working on the fuselage. When I go to join each section of it there are small buckling in the skin. This is my first fuselage that is a series of tubes. Some of the guys at Paper Modelers suggested using a sleeve system. I was going to try for a cockpit and clear windows also.I saw the pilot and his seat and the rear gunner. Any chance you can explain the front area near the cowling engine? It's larger then the main fuselage.You are miles ahead of me.
What a beautiful airplane. I just can't get enough of her. I can't thank you enough for the help on this aircraft model. These photos explain a lot to me. Thank you willy.


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PostPosted: Sat Jun 30, 2012 11:04 am 
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Waddy,
To get the tail of the fuselage pointed, I first used the brass rod in the picture. THen, I used a tooth pick to get the last of the curvature needed to get the point.

The engine cowling is actually pretty easy by all standards. First, I would lightly score the glue tabs on the main cowling piece. That will make it much easier to get a consistent fold on them when attaching the front piece. Then, just curve and glue the main piece. For the front piece, you'll want to put a good pre-curve into it. You could use a round pencil or something of similar size. I used the brass rod again. Then, just glue the tab and put the ends together. It'll take some dry-fitting to make sure the front piece matches up properly with the main cowl. But, if you glue right where it tells you to, it should fit great.


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PostPosted: Sun Jul 01, 2012 11:27 am 
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Thanks for this great tutorial. I have started this model several times. I am inspired. Time for me to start again. You really did this difficult (at least for me) fuselage. Makes it look easy. Can't wait for the finished model. Bill


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PostPosted: Mon Jul 02, 2012 8:49 am 
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Thanks Bill! From what I've found, by far the trickiest part is getting the fuselage fairing to the float to match up nicely. It doesn't quite fit perfectly, but it can be massaged into place. That part alone probably took me about 2 hours to dry-fitting and rechecking alignment before I got the nerve to glue it into place. Even that took me 20 minutes. I just glued little sections at a time to keep things lined up properly.


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PostPosted: Wed Jul 04, 2012 12:19 pm 
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Gonna be a slight break in the action as we are gearing up for a trip to Europe for a tad longer than a week. I'm on full packing mode at the moment, so the models have been pushed aside. I'll continue on when we return.


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PostPosted: Wed Jul 04, 2012 1:31 pm 
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I'm dead meat. Have a great time. We'll get back to it when you return. No worries. wc


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PostPosted: Wed Jul 04, 2012 5:22 pm 
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I'll have email access on the ship, but probably won't get to it more than every other day. You'll do great Waddy! Just take your time and dry-fit everything! :mrgreen:


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PostPosted: Thu Jul 19, 2012 11:38 am 
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Vacation is over and I'm back at it. The Baltic Sea and surrounding areas were a nice distraction from everything here at home. And, much cooler temps than home too (Highs in the low 70s) :twisted:

In the last installment, the wings were mounted and the outer main wing struts were installed. Today, we pick up with the inner wing supports and the rest of the plane.

Here, the inner struts are mounted on top of the fuselage to the underside of the wing. There are mounting marks (black lines) on both the fuselage and the bottom of the wings to help with alignment.
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Next, on to the tail surfaces. The pieces are pretty simple. Just cut out and fold over to match the rear edges of the pieces. Notice that the leading edges of the vertical and horizontal tail pieces are not scored, they are rolled! Once the pieces are made, attach to the fuselage using the marked areas as a guide.
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I used my super glue for this part so that the pieces attached firmly and quickly. Be sure to double or triple check alignment of parts before you use the super glue. Once it's on, it's on.


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PostPosted: Thu Jul 19, 2012 11:48 am 
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The next part of the journey was the wing floats and supports. The floats are identical, so use the same approach to both.

First, cut out the part carefully
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Then, pre-curve the top of the float, which is the center of the flat piece
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Then, fold over the tabs
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Then, glue together the back part of the piece
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Next, start working on gluing one of the sides to the top of the float. I prefer to start with the side with tabs on both long edges. it give a more solid attachment for the other side. Start with the small piece at the front, and work back
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Then, glue the other side down as well.
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Now, join the sides together. Be sure to glue the back edge together to make a sharp seam
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PostPosted: Thu Jul 19, 2012 11:53 am 
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When building the float supports, its important to score the lines and pre-bend the creases. When the support is ready to be attached, it should look like this.
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When attaching the support to the float, use the two lines on top of the float to help with placement and alignment. (NOTE: the two "open end" pieces face up and away from the float. This will be toward the fuselage when installed, so be sure to attach the float supports opposite of each other)
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Once you have the floats and supports completed, mount to the wings. Again, there are handy mounting lines on the wing. Again remember, the open end pieces go in toward the fuselage.
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PostPosted: Thu Jul 19, 2012 12:03 pm 
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Landing Gear!

These are one of my least favorite things about model aircraft. To complete the wheels, I used a skill demonstrated by the great moderator himself, Possm.

To start, I cut the wheels into 3 pieces. One is the tread, and then the two sides. First, I measured the tread width (3 mm) and made long strips of paper at the same width. In this case it was three strips per wheel.
Then, I pre-curved the tread and glued it together.
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Then, I took one strip at a time and rolled it up around a marker (it was to closest thing I had to the inside diameter of the wheel) and then glued that piece on the inside of the tread. I did the same with the second strip of paper as well
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Next, I glued to flat back piece of the wheel to the tread ring.
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Then I took the third strip and rolled it around a toothpick. I placed that small roll in the center of the wheel for added strength when attaching the wheel to the strut.
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I then formed the slightly conical wheel cover and glued it to the front side of the wheel.
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When building the landing gear struts, I took the triangular lower bracket and creased the arms downward and splayed open the small triangles at the end. This gives a good attachment point to the wheels. After carefully cutting out and folding the upper shock absorber, I started gluing the struts in place with super glue. There is another mounting line for the lower bracket on the float, just under the printed wheel bay. When mounted, the gear should look something like this
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PostPosted: Thu Jul 19, 2012 12:07 pm 
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And with that last installment, the Duck is cooked! I mean finished. :mrgreen: (I left off the propellor as it was only a single sided part, and it's on the instruction page which was printed on regular 20# paper, not on the heavier stock.

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I hope this tutorial will be helpful to you when you give this great model a try. If you have any questions, let them fly.


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